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Reptile New Arrivials 5.1.07
The Snake Rack Is Full!!! Click Read More... for more info!

 

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Saltwater Replacement Policy
All Saltwater Fish, Inverts, Corals & Anemones are sold without guarantees.  No refunds or exchanges will be given in the event of a loss.
Freshwater Fish Replacement Policy

Freshwater Fish will be replaced One Time or an in-store credit will be issued in the event of the fish death within 14 days of purchase, subject to the following conditions:

Dead fish must be returned when credit is issued.

 

A water sample must be provided in a separate container from the dead fish.

 

Freshwater fish will be replaced one time if the water test is without heightened levels of ammonia, nitrite, nitrate or improper pH levels.  Also, no credit will be issued if death was caused by injuries or aggression.

Squamosa Clams

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The Squamosa Clam (Tradacna squamosa) is considered by many aquarists to be the most adaptive species of clam, in regards to aquarium life.


Squamosa Clams are not as demanding of the intense light levels as many other Giant Clams. This generally makes them more suitable for life in captivity than many species with high light requirements. Because they are photosynthetic, light is extremely important to the survival of Squamosa Clams. In their natural environment, Squamosa Clams live in deeper areas of reefs at 30 to 50 feet. They are often found low on a reef wall or at the reef bottom, usually in a protected area. Generally, these clams should be placed in areas of the aquarium with low turbidity, since they normally live in calm waters in the wild.


Squamosa Clams are characterized by the fluted characteristics of their shells. The shells are in fact made of hard, projecting scales or flutes, which cover both the top and bottom surfaces. The scales are sharp enough to protect the clam from certain fish bites, and large enough to harbor various organisms. The shell is symmetrical, and by the time the fluted clam is mature, measures up to 16 inches. Shell color, though usually white, may be yellow, pink, or orange. The mantle of the Squamosa Clam is normally beige, brown, or gold. Some blue or green blotches may be present, and some specimens have stripes running parallel to the shell. The middle, or mantle, of a fluted clam is normally quite wide. The intake siphon is covered in large tentacles.


Squamosa Clams may be maintained under Power Compact or Metal Halide lighting. Like most Giant Clams, the Squamosa Clam will do well in temperatures remaining 74-80 F. The pH should remain at 8.0 to 8.4, and the specific gravity should be constant, around 1.023. Supplimental feedings are required in the care of this species. Calcium levels should be above 400 p.p.m. The shell rim should exhibit a clean white line of growth at all times, and if this is not present, the growth of your Squamosa Clam may be inhibited. Check light and water conditions to ensure that the environment is perfect for your clam.

UVB Lighting, Calcium & Vitamin D3

Most diurnal lizards that do not consume animals with whole bone matter(mice, rats, etc.) need to synthesize vitamin D3 in their skin for healthy growth. Ultraviolet B light (UVB) (290-320nm), is required. UVB is not present in significant quantities in normal fluorescent or incandescent bulbs in that they are designed to illuminate an area, not to provide UVB. Also, glass in windows and aquariums filter ultraviolet rays out of sunlight.


Vitamin D3 is necessary for the metabolism of calcium, which aids in strong bone development. A deficiency often results in Metabolic Bone Disease in reptiles. The calcium in the proper supplements also help to balance the phosphorous / calcium ratio in reptiles that eat large quantities of insects.



Supplements of Calcium and Vitamin D3 along with a proper UVB light will help insure the health of you diurnal lizards for years to come.

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